The Claremont Canyon Conservancy is a catalyst for the long-term protection and restoration of the canyon's natural environment and an advocate for comprehensive fire safety along its wildland/urban interface.

President's Message: September in Claremont Canyon

by L. Tim Wallace

 

Marilyn Goldhaber with Ellie

 

 

October is the height of fire season.  Please do be careful in your homes, yards and while hiking in wildlands.  Click here for our local KTVU report on the impending FEMA grant to remove flammable vegetation in the East Bay Hills.  Join the Garber Park Stewards in important stewardship activities (see below) and stand by for more October events in Claremont Canyon to be posted soon.

 

 

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Saturday, October 4, Sudden Oak Death Treatment Workshop, Garber Park. 10AM-Noon.  Attend a 2-hour field treatment session offered by Dr. Matteo Garbelotto, UCCE Specialist in Forest Pathology and Mycology, UC Berkeley.  Dr. Garbelotto will present and demonstrate the latest methods aimed at the prevention and spread of the SOD pathogen.  For treatment to be effective a number of factors need to be considered.  Dr. Garbelotto will address these factors and demonstrate application techniques in the lovely outdoor setting at Garber Park’s Fireplace Plaza.


Meet at Fireplace Plaza which is accessible from either the Claremont Ave Entrance or the Evergreen Lane Entrance.  For a map and directions: http://garberparkstewards.blogspot.com/p/directions.html. 

 

For more information contact Shelagh garberparkstewards@gmail.com


OCTOBER HABITAT RESTORATION WORKDAYS IN GARBER PARK

Tuesday, October 7.  10AM-Noon.  Join us as we continue our Fall Stewardship.  We will be removing invasive plants, caging young oaks, buckeyes, and maples, and performing trail maintenance in preparation for the winter rains and planting season.


Saturday, October 18.  10AM-Noon.  Fall Stewardship continues.  See Tuesday, October 7, above, for details.


Wear long sleeves and pants, and shoes with good traction.  We provide tools, gloves, water and snacks but we encourage volunteers to bring their own gloves and reusable water bottles.   


Map and Directionshttp://garberparkstewards.blogspot.com/p/directions.html.         

From Ashby Ave. go .4 mile up Claremont Ave to the Claremont Ave Entrance (just beyond 7380 Claremont Ave). It’s a short walk up the trail to Fireplace Plaza and the Evergreen Lane Entrance.  Bus: via AC Transit #49.  Exit at the stop at Ashby/Claremont Ave. intersection.  Then follow the directions above to the Claremont Ave Entrance.


Everyone Welcome.  No experience necessary.  Volunteering in Garber can be a great place for students to satisfy Community Service requirements.  Children under 18 must bring a Volunteer Waiver and Release of Liability Form, signed by a parent or guardian, available on our website www.garberparkstewards.org.  Children under 16 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.


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Homeowners' Guide to Wildfire Prevention by Bob Sieben Now Available


The guide is now available in PDF form on Oakland's Wildfire Prevention District's website and on the website of the North Hills Community Organization.  Please click here for a link.  
Hard copies are available on Amazon.com and at A Great Place for Books on LaSalle Avenue in Montclair Village. Dr. Sieben's book was written specifically for the homeowners of the Oakland Hills.  Single copies are available for $9, with sales tax paid. Bulk discounts are available.  (Dr. Robert Sieben is the retiring District 1 Member of the WAPD, fire prevention chair of NHCA and Hiller Highlands Phase V, and a Conservancy Founding Sponsor, as well as medical doctor.  Thanks Bob for your work.)


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Counting the Trees


by Fred Booker

 

Fred BookerThere has been much ado over UC’s proposal to remove fire prone invasive eucalyptus, pine and acacia from the slopes of Claremont Canyon. UC’s plan has often been described by opposition forces as a “clear cut,” evoking images of the denuded hillslopes following old fashioned logging operations in the Northwest. As is often the case when making an argument not backed by facts, it is easier to persuade people to your side by creating an emotional response through negative imagery. To those of us who have worked in the canyon, this seemed an odd characterization of a diverse forest filled with a wide variety of other plants (READ MORE)